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Badges, leaderboards, leveling up. These buzzwords sound like features in the latest video game, but, actually, they’re modern learning staples thanks to gamification and game-based learning. Instructional designers know that gamification’s flexibility and adaptability make it useful for many programs, including new hire orientation, compliance training, and technical skill building.

As the year ends, we look back at three eLearning trends of 2016. eLearning Trends: Gamification. eLearning Trends: Social Learning. Another trend that was critically important in 2016 per eLearning articles and bloggers was social learning. MORE

Yesterday evening (June 12) at approximately 6:10pm, Summer 2017 courses became unavailable to faculty in eLearning. Our technical group immediately began working with Blackboard to resolve the issue, and… More courses were made available again at approximately 9:30pm. (PLEASE NOTE: Students were not affected by this issue.) Our programmer continues to work with Blackboard to determine the cause of the issue. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you for your patience.

Educational psychologists distinguish between several types of constructivism: individual (or psychological) constructivism, such as Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, and social constructivism. This form of constructivism has a primary focus on how learners construct their own meaning from new information, as they interact with reality and with other learners who bring different perspectives. Constructivist learning environments require students to use their prior knowledge and experiences to formulate new, related, and/or adaptive concepts in learning (Termos, 2012[50]). Under this framework the role of the teacher becomes that of a facilitator, providing guidance so that learners can construct their own knowledge. Constructivist educators must make sure that the prior learning experiences are appropriate and related to the concepts being taught. Jonassen (1997) suggests “well-structured” learning environments are useful for novice learners and that “ill-structured” environments are only useful for more advanced learners. Educators utilizing a constructivist perspective may emphasize an active learning environment that may incorporate learner centered problem-based learning, project-based learning, and inquiry-based learning, ideally involving real-world scenarios, in which students are actively engaged in critical thinking activities. An illustrative discussion and example can be found in the 1980s deployment of constructivist cognitive learning in computer literacy, which involved programming as an instrument of learning.[51]:224 LOGO, a programming language, embodied an attempt to integrate Piagetan ideas with computers and technology.[51][52] Initially there were broad, hopeful claims, including “perhaps the most controversial claim” that it would “improve general problem-solving skills” across disciplines.[51]:238 However, LOGO programming skills did not consistently yield cognitive benefits.[51]:238 It was “not as concrete” as advocates claimed, it privileged “one form of reasoning over all others,” and it was difficult to apply the thinking activity to non-LOGO-based activities.[53] By the late 1980s, LOGO and other similar programming languages had lost their novelty and dominance and were de-emphasized amid criticisms.[54]

^ a b Johnson, Henry M (2007). “Dialogue and the construction of knowledge in e-learning: Exploring students’ perceptions of their learning while using Blackboard’s asynchronous discussion board”. Eurodl.org. ISSN 1027-5207. Retrieved 2013-10-22.

^ Andone, D., Holotescu, C., & Grosseck, G. (2014, November). Learning communities in smart cities. Case studies. In Web and Open Access to Learning (ICWOAL), 2014 International Conference on (pp. 1-4). IEEE.

Synchronous learning refers to the exchange of ideas and information with one or more participants during the same period. Examples are face-to-face discussion, online real-time live teacher instruction and feedback, Skype conversations, and chat rooms or virtual classrooms where everyone is online and working collaboratively at the same time. Since students are working collaboratively, synchronized learning helps students create an open mind because they have to listen and learn from their peers. Synchronized learning fosters online awareness and improves many students’ writing skills.[59]

According to a report by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, large amounts of personal data on children is collected by electronic devices that are distributed in schools in the United States. Often far more information than necessary is collected, uploaded and stored indefinitely. Aside name and date of birth, this information can include the child’s browsing history, search terms, location data, contact lists, as well as behavioral information.[180]:5 Parents are not informed or, if informed, have little choice.[180]:6 According to the report, this constant surveillance resulting from educational technology can “warp children’s privacy expectations, lead them to self-censor, and limit their creativity”.[180]:7

^ Nagy, A. (2005). The Impact of E-Learning, in: Bruck, P.A.; Buchholz, A.; Karssen, Z.; Zerfass, A. (Eds). E-Content: Technologies and Perspectives for the European Market. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 79–96

The capability of organizations to accumulate and apply new knowledge is a key factor in order to achieve the new competitive standards. A continuous changing diversity, to which the need of adaptation to the changes of external environment is added, speeds up the rate of development and business education. The new information and communication technologies speed up the rate of change and increase the need of education that is subject to a higher information flow. The achievements of information technology, along with changes within society, determine the creation of new paradigms for business education and training. Under these circumstances, e-learning has become one of the main educational forms of human resources in business. This research aims to measure the impact of some initiatives within human resources on an organization, market leader within pharmaceutical field, namely measuring the efficiency of business education programs concerning human resources through e-learning. Under these circumstances, the carried-out research aims to put into practice the theoretical frame of ROI (Return on Investment) methodology of evaluating the business education programs concerning human resources in five stages, suggested by J. J. Phillips. The research validates theoretical data of the surveyed model and it is based on the analysis of the data gathering process within the ROI Methodology. This work shows only aspects related to the measuring of the participants’ reaction towards the e-learning business education program, respectively.

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